Category Archives: FEA

Global Manufacturer of Engine Filters Saves 3 Months and Thousands of Dollars in Cyclic Fatigue Testing Program

A globally known filter manufacturer had a fast-paced program and needed help to reduce their test program time.

A non-linear plastic simulation analysis.

A non-linear plastic simulation analysis.

Starting with a first-pass iteration of a filter canister design, Sigma engineers used non-linear plastic simulation analysis to determine whether long-term cyclic loading would be likely to cause permanent deformation, and worse yet, failure.

After further simulation review we found that there were certain areas in the molded housing that were suspect to failure. As often found in these analyses, the defects were less than obvious.

The software and Sigma’s engineering analytical skills uncovered these areas, which saved the client needed time and money. The client modified the design and went to physical testing, saving 2 to 3 weeks of iterations. This insight got their program back on track and on budget.

Sigma’s engineering experience helps product launches stay on schedule by removing the unforeseen obstacles that delay new product development progress. Our team is capable of performing Linear Stress, Non-Linear Plastic Deformation, Computational Fluid Analysis, as well as other specialized engineering software.

Sigma Not Chicken To Take On Complex FEA Project

How much heat does it take to keep food safe for consumption? Sigma used its advanced engineering skills to answer this question. A New Jersey-based company asked Sigma to analyze their warming tray prototype by preforming a heat power analysis and thermal FEA on the heater element and control circuit.

This model was created to show the surface temperature of the warming plate.

This model was created to show the surface temperature of the warming plate.

The tray is designed to keep rotisserie chickens at a safe internal temperature of 140°F and breakfast sandwiches at a slightly lower temperature. This will be determined by a high and low setting that is set by an operator’s switch.

The first step was to determine the steady state heat power requirements to keep the chicken at temperature by using hand calculations. Then a simplified FEA was run to verify that it matched the
hand calculations.

The next step was to source heater elements that match the power requirements found in the hand and FEA calculations from the previous steps. The final step was to determine a control circuit to keep the surface temperature of the plate as constant as possible, meeting the FDA requirements for safe holding temperatures.

Want Sigma to turn up the heat on one of your projects? Contact us today and find out how Sigma Design Company can make your product a reality.

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